umt.world

BONUS EPISODE: The Gender Distinction in Communisation Theory

Another bonus episode before we get into volume 4 in the new year, continuing the discussion from last week, and the discussion that started from The Logic of Gender essay in Endnotes 3. This time we are reading P. Valentine’s 2012 contribution to the LIES Journal, coming out of Oakland / elsewhere. This is a critical intervention to the communisation tendency, especially the conversations happening around gender. An outsider perspective that directs its critique inward, toward the movement in a confrontational and polemical manner–much different from Endnotes’ tendency to direct its critique outward, toward easy targets like the police and the state.

Read the essay here.

Listen on YouTube.

BONUS EPISODE: Communization and the Abolition of Gender

Reading another essay from the Communization and its Discontents reader, edited by Benjamin Noys. This one is by Maya Andrea Gonzalez, “revolutionary Marxist feminist” and a member of the Endnotes collective. She is also the author of the essay from vol. 3 The Logic of Gender. In this work from a few years prior, Gonzalez traces a materialist history of gender relations under capitalism, connecting them to the communizer’s theory of revolution as an im-mediated practise of abolishing social relations, the most fundamental being the gender divide. Like Endnotes and many other communization groups following in the wake of TC, a point of disunity is taken to be a principle of overcoming: in this case, it is the disunity of the gender, and the bifurcation of human activity into productive and reproductive spheres, that will provide for the abolishment of capital.

Read the essay here.

Watch on YouTube.

BONUS EPISODE: Tending the Revolutionary Garden with Jasper Bernes

In this bonus episode, Uriah sits down with Jasper Bernes to discuss his essay from vol. 3 on logistics and its follow up, focusing on questions of agriculture and technology. We discuss Marx’s concept of the metabolic rift, permaculture, planning and logistics, reparations, and more. Leave a comment, hopefully we will have more guests on the show coming up soon.

Listen on YouTube.

Read The Belly of the Revolution here.

Listen to our episode on the logistics essay here.

Jasper’s website.

Follow Jasper on Twitter.

BONUS EPISODE: What are we to do?

This is a first in a series of bonus episodes that we will be putting out before diving into volume 4 of the journal. We are reading the essay authored by the Endnotes collective, included in the reader “Communization and its Discontents,” edited by Benjamin Noys and published by AK Press in 2012. The text largely a critical reflection on The Invisible Committee’s book, The Coming Insurrection, which represents a distinct brand of communisation theory. As opposed to Endnotes’s communist communisation, The Invisibile Committee / Tiqqun represent an anarchist-insurrectionist tendency that has not aged nearly as well as Endnotes’s writing.

Read the essay here.

Listen on YouTube.

Episode 3.6: The Limit Point of Capitalist Equality

This week’s essay is another intake, this time from Chris Chen. We are discussing race and identity politics. The essay argues that “race” is a process of socio-economic interpellation, in contra-distinction to identity politics which seeks to affirm racial identity. The author develops an anti-racist practise within the materialist framework of value-form theory. Instead of affirming identity, anti-racist practise should seek to abolish race by abolishing the social forces which impose it onto racialized categories of the population.

Read the essay here.

Listen on YouTube.

Episode 3.5: Logistics, Counterlogistics and the Communist Prospect

In this very special episode recorded on Halloween, and released on the eve of the American presidential election, we are discussing Jasper Bernes’s (@outsidagitator) essay on the history of logistics. Posited as capital’s theory of its own globalized form, the essay situates us in 2011, the same moment of historical upheaval this entire collection of essays has focused on. We discuss the concepts of “cognitive mapping” taken from Frederic Jameson, “hydraulic capitalism” taken from Deleuze and Guattari, Heideggerean ontology, technological alienation, and more.

Read the essay here.

Listen on Youtube.

Episode 3.4: A Rising Tide Lifts All Boats

This week we are discussing the riot wave that burned throughout England in 2011. Precipitated by anti-austerity protests and anti-police brutality protests, Endnotes explore the myriad social movements that coalesced in days of protests, arson, property damage, and violence directed toward cops, and toward protesters from the cops. Sound familiar? The parallels to the riot wave that swept the United States this summer are striking, and the predictable of this long, well-researched historical essay is that riot waves of are always the result of an extended historical process. Developing from this, we discuss the historical continuity of tactics employed by insurgents–as well as repressive tactics employed by the police.

Read the essay here.

Watch on YouTube (link goes live on 11:45am EST, Monday 26 October).