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BONUS EPISODE: The Gender Distinction in Communisation Theory

Another bonus episode before we get into volume 4 in the new year, continuing the discussion from last week, and the discussion that started from The Logic of Gender essay in Endnotes 3. This time we are reading P. Valentine’s 2012 contribution to the LIES Journal, coming out of Oakland / elsewhere. This is a critical intervention to the communisation tendency, especially the conversations happening around gender. An outsider perspective that directs its critique inward, toward the movement in a confrontational and polemical manner–much different from Endnotes’ tendency to direct its critique outward, toward easy targets like the police and the state.

Read the essay here.

Listen on YouTube.

BONUS EPISODE: Communization and the Abolition of Gender

Reading another essay from the Communization and its Discontents reader, edited by Benjamin Noys. This one is by Maya Andrea Gonzalez, “revolutionary Marxist feminist” and a member of the Endnotes collective. She is also the author of the essay from vol. 3 The Logic of Gender. In this work from a few years prior, Gonzalez traces a materialist history of gender relations under capitalism, connecting them to the communizer’s theory of revolution as an im-mediated practise of abolishing social relations, the most fundamental being the gender divide. Like Endnotes and many other communization groups following in the wake of TC, a point of disunity is taken to be a principle of overcoming: in this case, it is the disunity of the gender, and the bifurcation of human activity into productive and reproductive spheres, that will provide for the abolishment of capital.

Read the essay here.

Watch on YouTube.

BONUS EPISODE: What are we to do?

This is a first in a series of bonus episodes that we will be putting out before diving into volume 4 of the journal. We are reading the essay authored by the Endnotes collective, included in the reader “Communization and its Discontents,” edited by Benjamin Noys and published by AK Press in 2012. The text largely a critical reflection on The Invisible Committee’s book, The Coming Insurrection, which represents a distinct brand of communisation theory. As opposed to Endnotes’s communist communisation, The Invisibile Committee / Tiqqun represent an anarchist-insurrectionist tendency that has not aged nearly as well as Endnotes’s writing.

Read the essay here.

Listen on YouTube.

Episode 3.7: Spontaneity, Mediation, Rupture

Wrapping up volume 3 of Endnotes with a meditation on the relationship between the nature of anti-capitalist struggle, the role of militants in realizing that struggle, and what struggle can hope to accomplish. This essay further advances a definition of communisation, and develops the collective’s vision for the conditions of possibility of a communist revolution. It ends on a very intriguing cliffhanger, too, arguing that class consciousness is not a sufficient basis for revolution, but that capital is really the one thing we all have in common.

Read the essay here.

Listen on YouTube.

Episode 3.6: The Limit Point of Capitalist Equality

This week’s essay is another intake, this time from Chris Chen. We are discussing race and identity politics. The essay argues that “race” is a process of socio-economic interpellation, in contra-distinction to identity politics which seeks to affirm racial identity. The author develops an anti-racist practise within the materialist framework of value-form theory. Instead of affirming identity, anti-racist practise should seek to abolish race by abolishing the social forces which impose it onto racialized categories of the population.

Read the essay here.

Listen on YouTube.

Episode 2.6: The History of Subsumption

Frank Stella, “Die Fahne Hoche!” enamel on canvas, 308.6 x 185.4 cm, 1959.

This week we are discussing the historiography of class conflict. Endnotes critically analyse the Marxist category of subsumption, originating in Kant and Hegel. Kant uses the concept in his epistemological distinction between synthetic and analytic; Hegel extends it to the metaphysical subsumption of one subject to another. Finally, Marx uses the concept into a materialist critique of capitalist social relations, where labour is subsumed by capital. Endnotes establish their critical position in relation to the contemporary literature of Antonio Negri, Jacques Camatte, Theorie Communiste, and the legacy of “programmatism” (Leninism).

Read the essay here.

Watch on YouTube.

Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Download the mp3.

Episode 2.5: The Moving Contradiction

Detail from Quentin Massys, “St John Altarpiece (central panel),” oil on panel, 1507-1508.

This week’s episode of the Footnotes to Endnotes podcast is on the essay “The Moving Contradiction.” The theme continues building the same methodological and theoretical premises the Endnotes collective have been outline over the course of this issue, this time at a much more abstract level. Our verdict is that this essay is “bad,” repetitive, and so we use it instead as a a point of departure for a more free-form conversation about Marxism, communism, the revolution, theory…everything we’ve been discussing in the series so far, but without being beholden to the text.

Read the essay here.

Listen to the podcast on YouTube.

Thumbnail is a detail from a highly macabre altarpiece you can see here.