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BONUS EPISODE: The Gender Distinction in Communisation Theory

Another bonus episode before we get into volume 4 in the new year, continuing the discussion from last week, and the discussion that started from The Logic of Gender essay in Endnotes 3. This time we are reading P. Valentine’s 2012 contribution to the LIES Journal, coming out of Oakland / elsewhere. This is a critical intervention to the communisation tendency, especially the conversations happening around gender. An outsider perspective that directs its critique inward, toward the movement in a confrontational and polemical manner–much different from Endnotes’ tendency to direct its critique outward, toward easy targets like the police and the state.

Read the essay here.

Listen on YouTube.

BONUS EPISODE: Communization and the Abolition of Gender

Reading another essay from the Communization and its Discontents reader, edited by Benjamin Noys. This one is by Maya Andrea Gonzalez, “revolutionary Marxist feminist” and a member of the Endnotes collective. She is also the author of the essay from vol. 3 The Logic of Gender. In this work from a few years prior, Gonzalez traces a materialist history of gender relations under capitalism, connecting them to the communizer’s theory of revolution as an im-mediated practise of abolishing social relations, the most fundamental being the gender divide. Like Endnotes and many other communization groups following in the wake of TC, a point of disunity is taken to be a principle of overcoming: in this case, it is the disunity of the gender, and the bifurcation of human activity into productive and reproductive spheres, that will provide for the abolishment of capital.

Read the essay here.

Watch on YouTube.

Episode 3.7: Spontaneity, Mediation, Rupture

Wrapping up volume 3 of Endnotes with a meditation on the relationship between the nature of anti-capitalist struggle, the role of militants in realizing that struggle, and what struggle can hope to accomplish. This essay further advances a definition of communisation, and develops the collective’s vision for the conditions of possibility of a communist revolution. It ends on a very intriguing cliffhanger, too, arguing that class consciousness is not a sufficient basis for revolution, but that capital is really the one thing we all have in common.

Read the essay here.

Listen on YouTube.

Episode 3.5: Logistics, Counterlogistics and the Communist Prospect

In this very special episode recorded on Halloween, and released on the eve of the American presidential election, we are discussing Jasper Bernes’s (@outsidagitator) essay on the history of logistics. Posited as capital’s theory of its own globalized form, the essay situates us in 2011, the same moment of historical upheaval this entire collection of essays has focused on. We discuss the concepts of “cognitive mapping” taken from Frederic Jameson, “hydraulic capitalism” taken from Deleuze and Guattari, Heideggerean ontology, technological alienation, and more.

Read the essay here.

Listen on Youtube.

Episode 3.3: The Logic of Gender

Jasper Johns, “Numbers.”

How do you fit the gender/sex binary into the framework of value-form theory, and the method of systemic dialectic? Listen to this week’s episode to find out, our first episode recorded virtually, and Endnotes’ first sustained foray into Marxist feminism.

Read the essay here.

Listen on YouTube.

Episode 3.2: The Holding Pattern

Jasper Johns, “0-9,” 11 7/8 x 10 3/4 inches, ink on plastic, 1979.

This week on the podcast we are going back to 2013 and discussing the Occupy Wall Street movement, the “movement of the squares” internationally, and all the explosions of worker’s movements of that period. We go back and forth about the utopianism of the Endnotes collective, and arrive at a better understanding of just what “communisation theory” really entails.

Read the essay here.

Watch on YouTube.

Episode 2.6: The History of Subsumption

Frank Stella, “Die Fahne Hoche!” enamel on canvas, 308.6 x 185.4 cm, 1959.

This week we are discussing the historiography of class conflict. Endnotes critically analyse the Marxist category of subsumption, originating in Kant and Hegel. Kant uses the concept in his epistemological distinction between synthetic and analytic; Hegel extends it to the metaphysical subsumption of one subject to another. Finally, Marx uses the concept into a materialist critique of capitalist social relations, where labour is subsumed by capital. Endnotes establish their critical position in relation to the contemporary literature of Antonio Negri, Jacques Camatte, Theorie Communiste, and the legacy of “programmatism” (Leninism).

Read the essay here.

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